Mudding, Priming, & Painting

We finally got around to mudding the drywall. It’s only been 3 months since we hung the drywall. We started with smaller taping knives and worked our way up to wider ones with each layer of mud.

The first coat of the long living room wall. A built-in will be going in the opening on the right.

The master bedroom’s first coat.

Second layer.

On the last layer we tried wet sanding with a damp sponge. We had wring out the sponge a lot and be careful to be very gentle so as to not take off too much mud. It worked pretty well though. We did follow up with a light dry sand afterwords.

 

Onto the main bathroom where we’re focusing all of our efforts right now. We just finished the laying down the tile floor and grouting it with epoxy grout.

Toilet nook:

And the ceiling that we weren’t planning to have to drywall until the electrician fell through it…twice.

 

Next up was priming and we added the sand texture into the primer. That worked OK but I think we need to find a way to apply the texture more evenly than with a roller because we had a lot of areas that needed more texture to make it look even.

The future access panel for the shower shut off valves next to the toilet.

 

Then I asked Flannel Man to skip ahead and install the light fixtures temporarily so I could pick the paint color for the upper half of the walls. The construction light we were using up to this point was just too yellow to pick out paint.

We had a minor issue in that the lights couldn’t sit flush with the wall. The center bolt that holds them on was meant to fit into a standard depth electrical box not the shallow pan boxes we had to use because of studs being in the way. Flannel Man was later able to cut down the bolts without messing up the threads.

 

The bottom half of the room was going to be painted white to look like wainscoting but the top half I wanted some type of light blue or green color. I had a whole pile of paint chips from various stores.

I considered the tile neutral so I thought any color would look good but holding the swatches up to the tile I found the tile had a very blue undertone to it. So the greens and green grays seemed off to me.

 

I narrowed it down to a few favorites and taped them on the wall. At this point I realized that the G24 base light that came with the bath exhaust fan was a soft white so it gave off a slightly yellow glow. But the florescent bulbs I picked for the sconces were a bright white. We liked the bright white better so all of the white in the room didn’t look dirty or yellowed. Eventually we’ll replace the bath light with a similar temperature light but for now we looked at both for picking out the paint colors. Soft white light with pure white Azek moulding:

Left to right: SW 2640 Skylark, SW 6218 Tradewind, Behr UL220-12 Urban Mist, Behr 720E-2 Light French Gray, Behr 720E-3 Rocky Mountain Sky, the sliver on the end was just from Tradewind’s long card.

 

SW Skylark is actually an exterior color but it color matches BM’s Glacier Lake which I saw in an inspiration picture I liked so I was considering having it mixed in an interior formula.

Bright white light with American Olean Catarina Coliseum White tile:

My two favorite were the two on the left. In the end I felt Skylark might be too pale and not contrast enough with the white wainscoting but I liked the mix of green, blue, and green that still managed to work with the tile. I went with the gray/blue Tradewind which I hoped would give the room a nice pop of color. Plus it’s one of interior designer Phoebe Howard’s favorite blue colors along with the one shade lighter SW Top Sail…so you can’t go wrong with that!

 

At this point Flannel Man started with the wainscoting paint. I had tried to get it color matched with a piece of the vinyl trim we were using for the wainscoting. But the color reader was acting up that day so the Sherwin Williams guy attempted to come up with the color mixture by eye. Four tries at tinting, shaking, and drying a drop of paint on the sample and he thought he had something. At that point I just wanted to get the heck out of there after waiting around for almost an hour! So I told FM we’d try the color and if it wasn’t right we could have it re-tinted. Well FM must have not been paying attention because I talked to him the next day and he had painted all of the ceiling and the wainscoting before realizing the color was PINK!

Taking a closer look at the trim we had I realized the straight pieces of vinyl we had bought were a different color than the Azek moulding order that came in after we had bought them. Originally, we were going to get the matching straight Azek but it was textured on one side, had a rougher finish, and didn’t have rounded corners. Plus the Azek was 3 times as much as the stuff we found at Menard’s. The straight pieces didn’t match the pink color of the wall or ceiling at all but it was darker than the Azek. So I guess we would be painting the trim after all (we were hoping we could get away with not).

 

I took the pink paint back and both of the samples and the Sherwin Williams lady was very sympathetic. She found that the straight bright white base they use matched the Azek exactly so matching it between types of paint (for the doors) became very easy. Too bad they don’t give you a discount for not needing any tinting! With a two new cans of Duration; one in the bright white base and one in Tradewind the room was looking much better.

Sophie is tired of her humans spending so much time in this room.

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4 Responses to “Mudding, Priming, & Painting”


  1. 1 JoJo March 12, 2012 at 12:18 pm

    You guys are moving right along! I cannot wait until our living room is in the mudding stage.

  2. 2 Carrie @ Hazardous Design March 13, 2012 at 7:02 pm

    Wow guys! You are making great progress. It won’t be long now :)
    Btw, choosing paint color is such a daunting task. The one you selected is perfect for the bathroom.

  3. 3 LINDA from EACH LITTLE WORLD March 14, 2012 at 7:20 am

    We’ve been using Benjamin Moore for our paint jobs and using the little sample jars on old bookcase boards to help us figure out the color. Picking paint colors is a killer job. When you get it right, nothing makes a room look better but we have repainted whole rooms a couple of times trying to get it right. Luckily the memory of all that extra work fades!

  4. 4 Bobby April 8, 2012 at 7:58 am

    Your progress is great. Looks like you’re entirely too conservative with your mud though. Your seams should be huge. At least 15″ wide when you’re done. Each coat should incorporate new Sheetrock under each pass. It spreads the buildup from your three coats across a larger area giving a flatter appearance. Also allows for feathering to a very fine point.


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This is the story of two twenty something newlyweds who are learning to adjust to life in their first house, a 1973 fixer-upper.
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